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palestinian status at the u.n.; reading the fine print; tackling immigration reform and re-purposing digital data gathered during the campaign. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: wall street tracked the ups and downs of the fiscal cliff drama in washington tod. at one point, the dow jones industrial average was off more than 100 points. but stocks made up the ground after the president's talk of a deal by christmas. the dow ended with a gain of nearly 107 points to close at 12,985. the nasdaq rose 24 points to close well over 2,991. a moderate republican senator susan collins of maine voiced new concerns today about u.n. ambassador susan rice. it stemmed from rice's initial account, on a sunday talk show, of the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. at the time, she said it began as an anti-american ptest, but she now says she was working off faulty intelligence. rice met with collins for 90 minutes today, but afterward the senator remained critical. >> i still have many questions that remain unanswered. i continue to be troubled by the
.s. will refer the matter to the u.n. security council if they go ahead with the launch. >> we will be prepared to work with our partners, including at the united nations security council, to respond in a swift, effective, and credible manner. >> davies said the u.s. could strengthen sanctions. he said existing penalties have already hampered north korea's nuclear program. davies has been holding discussions with his counterparts from china, as well japan and south korea. he said he hopes the chinese can use their influence with their allies in pyongyang. u.s. diplomats have made similar warnings over the years and the north koreans have ignored them. >> reporter: the ballistic missile launch will be the second since kim jong-un took pow area year ago. it will use the same launch pad at a site in the northwestern part of the country. before the first test in april, officials in pyongyang said the 30-meter, three-stage rocket was meant to carry a satellite. but japan, the united states and south korea said the launch was in fact a ballistic missile test. the test ended in failure with the rocket
best november since 1973. in syria, the u.n. announced it is pulling out non-essential international staff for their own safety. those who remain will be restricted to the capital city, damascus. separately, the u.s. voiced mounting concern about activity at syrian government sites storing chemical weapons. this afternoon, president obama warned syrian leader bashar al- assad not to cross that line. oday i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command, the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences. and you will be held accountable. >> sreenivasan: in response, syria's government released a statement saying it would never use chemical weapons on its own people. the regime has never confirmed it has such weapons. there were warnings about greater curbs on the internet, as the world's nations gathered today for a summit on telecommunications. the 11-day conference in dubai is the first such review since 1988, well before the web was ful
as a nonmember observer state. many jewish groups denounced the u.n. action, saying it undermines future peace negotiations with israel. some u.s. christian and muslim leaders supported the move. the palestinians were not granted full u.n. membership, but their upgraded status could allow them access to other u.n. and international bodies, including the international criminal court where they could possibly bring charges against israel. the united states was one of nine nations that voted against the resolution. >>> in egypt, seven coptic christians and a controversial american pastor have been sentenced to death over an anti-islam film that sparked massive protests in several muslim countries in september. but the sentences can not be carried out since none of the eight lives in egypt. a u.s.-muslim organization urged the court to drop the charges, saying the prophet muhammed taught forgiveness. florida pastor terry jones was among those sentenced for promoting the film. in 2010, jones caused international outrage after he threatened to burn copies of the koran. >>>a neinterfaith center backe
president made his last plea to gain the support of delegation from u.n. member states. >> translator: i am hoping everyone's decision will give a birth certificate to the state of palestine. >> the assembly voted on a resolution to award palstines nonmember state. >> the result of the voting is as follows. in favor, 138. opposed, 9. abstentions, 41. >> reporter: an overwhelming majority voted in favor. among the minority who voted against resolution were israel and the united states. they argue that the palestine state hood should be negotiated between the two parties first. thursday's vote was a significant victory for the palestinians after their bid to gain full u.n. membership was shelved in the security council. being recognized as a state pal stain my exercise its new right to investigate alleged war crimes by israel. critics say it would the detrimental. it remains to be seen whether the new status will help achieve its dream of indepeence. >>> car bomb explosions rock two cities in central iraq killing 35 people and injuring more than 150. police suspect the attacks are aimed at sp
. >> the lead author of the latest u.n. report is kevin schaffer. he gave a briefing in doha, qatar, on the sidelines of the u.n. conference on climate change. the authors say permafrost contains huge amounts of carbon in the form of frozen organic matter. their estimate is 1,700 gigatons, twice the amount of carbon currently in the atmosphere. permafrost covers a quarter of the northern hemisphere including large parts of siberia and canada. the report says it could release as much as 135 gigatons of co2 by the end of the century. it warns of radical changes in ecosystems and costly damage to human infrastructure as well. >> permafrost tends to be hard and very durable, but when it thaws the ice turns to water and permafrost gets soft and infrastructure built on top of it can collapse. >> the report comes as delegates from around the world negotiate ways to reduce greenhouse gases at the conference. the scientists warn emissions from permafrost could start in the next few decades. >>> youngsters are at the climate talks to warn about the impact of global warming around the planet.
in april. that launch ended in failure. they've given their schedule and planned trajectory to the u.n. in charge of maritime safety. officials with the international maritime organization say the north koreans pn to launch twee 7:00 a.m. and noon local time. the first stage of a three stage missile is expected to fall in the yellow seat west of south korea. the second is expected to land east of the philippines. alerts to shipping companies have been issued. government officials in seoul have seen the scenario before. foreign ministry officials met separately with envoys from japan, the united states, china and russia. it's believed they discussed ways to cancel the launch. the ships have technology to track missiles. they're also considering raising the country's alert status by one notch. >>> euro zone finance ministers approved a loan just last week. now the greeks have announced one way they will use the funds. what's the latest? >> one of the requirements for greek receiving the bailout fund is they cut down their debt. they will buy back government bonds a t a discount. greek of
. >> reporter: experts believe cholera was brought here by u.n. peacekeepers. untreated sewage from this base flowed into a tributary of the river, the major source of water foroth washing and drinking. cholera is spread by fecal-oral contact. two years on 200,000 patients have been sickened, 750 d 7,500 have died from diarrhea and fluid loss. each flood brings more contaminated water, more cases. the epidemic prompted massive relief efforts and public campaigns. on the streets and in classrooms promoting hygiene and sanitation. fatalities have dropped from 10% of cases early on to about 1%. still, 600 people have died from cholera this year. many in remote areas even those unaffected by floods. there's now plenty of awareness of cholera in haiti. the biggest challenge for people today is distance. as the epidemic subsided over the last few months many treatment centers have been closed in the remote areas. getting to plays that remain open is a huge challenge that can take hours. and that delay can be fatal. this man, a 27-year-old mother of three, will likely recover having made it in time
would strengthen their hand in future peace talks with israel. but the israeli ambassador to the u.n., ron prosor, warned that the palestinians are turning their backs on peace. >> for as long as president abbas prefers symbolism over reality, as long as he prefers to travel to new york for u.n. resolutions rather than travel to jerusalem for genuine dialogue, any hope of peace will be out of reach. >> sreenivasan: meanwhile, a bipartisan group of u.s. senators said today they will push to cut off u.s. aid, if the palestinians use their new status to bring israel before the international criminal court. in iraq, a wave of attacks today killed at least 43 people. most of the victims were in the city of hillah, south of baghdad. back-to-back explosions targeted shi-ite pilgrims and emergency responders. the force of the blasts left twisted wreckage of cars outside shops in a busy commercial area. a third bombing killed six people near a shrine in the city of karbala. a year-long inquiry into british media practices ended today with a call for new regulation. lord justice brian leveson
the development one day after the u.n. general assembly recognized palestine as a non-member observer state, including gaza, the west bank and east jerusalem. the palestinians quickly condemned any new settlement building. chief negotiator saeb erekat accused israel of "defying the whole international community." in syria, internet access and most phone service was blocked for a second day. opposition activists blamed the regime. government officials insisted rebels were behind the outage. meanwhile, fighting continued in and around damascus, but government troops managed to reopen the road to the city's airport. the u.s. soldier accused of espionage in the wikileaks document dump has conceded he considered suicide after s arrest. private first class bradley manning was cross-examined today in a pre-trial hearing at fort meade, maryland. he admitted making a noose out of bed sheets before being sent to the u.s. marine corps brig at quantico, virginia. manning says his treatment there was so harsh, the charges should be dismissed. the military says manning was a suicide risk, so jailers kept
would be held to account. >> brown: that was a view shared by u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon, speaking at a climate conference in qatar. >> the country has a fundamental responsibility to keep this stockpile of chemical weapons in the safest way. i have warned that if in any case these should be used then there will be huge consequences and they should be accountable. >> brown: and as fears of chemical warfare grow, the humanitarian crisis has steadily worsened. more refugees streamed into turkey today, fleeing syrian air raids. >> brown: for more on the syrian chemical weapons threat i'm joined by leonard spector, a weapons and nonproliferation expert with the monterey institute of international studies. that can be hard to say. welcome back. the white house says it has increased concern the government might be prepared to use these weapons. what does that mean? what are they seeing? >> we don't know precisely what they're seeing. there are rumors that there is some sort of preparation for the chemicals that would be used in these weapons. there are preliminary sts that
downturn or whatever else might happen. still, n.y.u. professor april klein says companies are over doing it. >> i know they say you can never be too rich or too thin, but companies can in fact be too rich. and, sometimes you do want to shrink out the cash. >> reporter: that's because too much cash can make a company a takeover target. and, with interest rates so low, all that money is just not productive. special dividends are one option for corporate treasurers struggling to spend it. but, what happened to firms investing capital for the future, by hiring new workers, buying other businesses, or on research and development? experts say we won't see that until lawmakers get their act together. >> right now corporate managers are essentially holding their cash waiting for greater policy clarity. and, until greater policy clarity comes, i don't expect to see an real significant deployment of cash whether it be in investment or returning cash to shareholders. >> reporter: and, then, there are share buybacks, which like dividends are popular this year. buybacks are considered a sign manageme
are having trying to find new projects in regions outside the u.s. and with interest rates currently at historic lows, the timing was right to ink the two deals. diane eaabrook, "n.b.r., chicago. >> tom: daniel rohr is a metals and mining analyst from morningstar and joins us from chicago. dan, how unique of a deal is this in the u.s. to have mining and energy drilling all in the same company? >> it is very unusual, forthe p. decades, ago, however, we had seen a lot of the oil majors, folks like amco, with exposure to mining as well. this is an animal we haven't seen in quit sometime in the u.s. >> t: what drove the deal for freport, why did it want to go outside its expertise mining, that was two generations of leaders ago. why now? >> yeah. i'm still struggling with the underlying strategic rationale for this deal. judging by the stock market, i can't see a clear rationale as far as why they did this. what management has said is they see a compelling story for oil and gas demand over the next several decades, and the purchase of plains and m.n.r., was a good way to bet on that outl
technology improves and gets less expensive. diane eastabrook, "n.b.r.," chicago. >> tom: tomorrow, we'll have more on the auto industry with the outlook on the u.s. from the world's most profitable automaker, volkswagen. >> susie: more pressure on s.a.c. capital today on word that the u.s. government might bring civil fraud charges against the firm, one of the biggest hedge funds in the world. during a conference call with investors, the company said it has received a so-called wells notice from the securities and exchange commission, often the first step to formal charges. the move comes a week after a former portfolio manager was charged with running the most lucrative insider trading schemes. s.a.c.'s billionaire founder, steve cohen, told clients he is confident that he "acted appropriately." well, another big company today authorizing a special dividend in anticipation of higher taxes next year. now it's costco jumping on the dividend bandwagon as a way to beat some of the impact of the fiscal cliff fallout. the wholesale club operator announced a special dividend of $7 a share t
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14